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Real-estate: buying or renting in Germany

Find Furnished Housing in Germany – Top 6 Tips to Get an Apartment

| Januar 29, 2014

Why is it such a nightmare to find furnished housing in Germany? This is a question that a lot of those who have come to live in Germany unprepared asks themselves. Truth be told, hunting for an apartment, more so those that fall into the category of furnished housing in Germany is a nightmarish affair which can usually only be pulled off by a force akin to divine intervention if you are short in time and money, and yes, we are not kidding. Before you try to move to Germany, prepare yourself for the herculean task of finding furnished housing by employing the tips below.

Find Furnished Housing in Germany Ahead of Time 

And by ahead of time, it should be done a few months up to a year in advance of your intended stay. If you are only going to stay for a few weeks, there companies like Home-Company and Statt-Hotel which can help, just be prepared to lower than your standards in terms of living spaces. However, for those intending to stay a few months up to a year, then the hunt should start as early as you can, as most landlords would often favour those who will rent for longer than a period of a year. 

Make Sure to Seek Furnished Housing When Staying in Germany 

Meaning, specifically look for ads which says either “furnished housing” or “furnished apartment”. Why? Because in Germany, an unfurnished flat can mean totally unfurnished or totally bare without light fixtures, built in cabinets and closets, and yes, sometimes not even a sink! Now, unless you are staying for a few years and has a lot of money, you may not want to shell out much cash to buy everything. Also, even if you are prepared to renovate the whole place, you might be asked to bring the place back to its original condition when your lease is up, a total nightmare! This is why you must specifically look for apartments or housing which are furnished.

Seek Professional Help to Find Furnished Housing in Germany 

Sure, one of the exhilarating experiences of moving abroad is to see if you can do things on your own, but for a country like Germany, it is better to seek the help of a Home-Finding Company or a Real Estate Agent who knows the market well in the area you want to live in. Yes, they can cost a bit more but they can be of great help when you are short of time. 

Ready 3,000-10,000 Euros in Cash to Find Furnished Housing in Germany 

 

 

When you first get to Germany and is keen on moving unto your very own furnished apartment, chances are, you have no bank account yet and you will be asked to pay the initial month’s rent and 1-3 months deposit. Supposing the apartment is only 1,000 euros a month, you need to pay 2,000-3,000 euros before you move in. If you used professional services to find a furnished apartment, they can charge 1-3x the monthly fee of the apartment. Meaning, if you got an agent to get you the 1,000 euros apartment, you may need to pay that agent up to 3,000 euros plus 3,000 euros to the landlord, not to mention all the other expenses may incur on your way to find a furnished apartment.

Read Local Papers to Find Furnished Housing in Germany if You Can 

Oftentimes, house owners with a bit of space will advertise in local papers. This is where you’ll find the best bargains and the rarest finds of furnished housing in Germany because they are not advertised online. This would also be a great way to brush up on your German, as most of these papers are written in German. Either that, or employ the help of a local friend (who might also help you brush up with your German).

Find Furnished Housing in Germany by Learning a Few German Words 

Here is a short introduction to German housing and apartment terms: 

  • zimmer means room, so an advertisement saying a house (whonung in German) is 4zi, means that the house has 4 rooms – 2 bedrooms, a dining room, and a living room. Note that in Germany, the bathroom and the kitchen is not usually counted in the number of rooms that a house or an apartment has
  • BJ is an abbreviation for baujahr, which pertains to the year the house was built. 
  • QM is the number of square meters that makes up the total area of the place. 
  • Du pertains to a shower (no bathtub).
  • Bad pertains to bathtub (no shower).
  • WC pertains to toilet (yes, only the toilet).
  • Other terms not included here can be asked or discussed with your agent or landlord.
  • With all these 6 tips, finding furnished housing in Germany is no doubt still a nightmare for many. We only wish to share some useful information to make you feel as confident and as welcome as you can be without heading for the hills after reading what you have to go through (just kidding!) Cheers to finding that elusive German furnished apartment!